Loading...
Paper

Written Paper

Milk marketing and value chain constraints  [2008]

Tariq, M. (University of Agriculture, Faisalabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Livestock Management and Inst. of Animal Nutrition and Feed Technology) Mustafa, M.I. (University of Agriculture, Faisalabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Livestock Management and Inst. of Animal Nutrition and Feed Technology) Iqbal, A. (University of Agriculture, Faisalabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Livestock Management and Inst. of Animal Nutrition and Feed Technology) Nawaz, H.

Access the full text

NOT AVAILABLE
Milk provides several essential dietary components for humans of all ages. In Pakistan, milk production during 2007-08 has been reported to be 34 million tones (about 58% from buffaloes, 35% from cattle) and the rest from camel, sheep, and goat). Per capita availability of milk is 169 litres/annum. However, it varies from place to place both in quality and quantity. At present, Pakistan is acclaimed to be at 4th position in the world in milk production. Pakistan is said to be surplus in milk production; but due to lack of proper planning, collection and distribution facilities, a major portion of the total production about 97% is consumed, per force, by the producers in the far flung areas and only 3-4% of the total milk is being processed and marketed through formal channels. Milk and milk products represent 27% of total household expenditure on food items in Pakistan. The neglect about this valuable commodity appears highly undesirable in view of the fact that milk production despite its very low yield, is even today far ahead of the major cash crops such as wheat, cotton, rice and sugarcane. There is a huge demand for both powdered and packed milk in the neighboring countries of Iran, UAE, Saudia Arabia besides Malaysia, and Philippine, which Pakistan can successfully harness to its advantage. Unlike other progressive countries where sale of raw milk is disallowed by law and processing is mandatory due to milk being one of the two major carriers of dise
ases (water being the other), Pakistan continues to allow 97% milk to be distributed through the traditional Gawala system. To the bacteria of tuberculosis and hepatitis that naturally occur in milk, the Gawala adds many more varieties through the addition of contaminated water for its dilution. The contractors who collect milk in Punjab through the Dodhis-the middlemen, and sell it to the urban consumers, go a step further. They add unhygenically produced ice slabs, soda bicarb and sometimes formalin to the milk they collect to prevent it from going bad due to intense heat in summer. All the people involved in the milk trade should be trained in the skills of efficient marketing of hygienic milk and value chain knowledge. Along with all the basic principles of clean and hygienic milk production, on farm value addition should also be emphasized. Both the provincial as well as federal governments S1lould play their active role to improve the situation. This paper discusses all the possibilities to improve the marketing of milk to harness its tremendous potential for the betterment of national economy and also to know the constraints that hamper the availability of this essential food stuff in terms of both quantity and quality.

From the journal

Pakistan Journal of Agricultural Sciences (Pakistan)

ISSN : 0552-9034

Loading...