AGRIS

Data provider:

Icon data provider

The National Agricultural Library is one of four national libraries of the United States, with locations in Beltsville, Maryland and Washington, D.C. It houses one of the world's largest and most accessible agricultural information collections and serves as the nexus for a national network of state land-grant and U.S. Department of Agriculture field libraries. In fiscal year 2011 (Oct 2010 through Sept 2011) NAL delivered more than 100 million direct customer service transactions.

Journal Article

Article de revue

Dietary nutrient intakes and skin-aging appearance among middle-aged American women [Erratum: 2008 Aug., v. 88, no. 2, p. 480.]  [2007]

Cosgrove, Maeve C.; Franco, Oscar H.; Granger, Stewart P.; Murray, Peter G.; et al.

Visualise le texte intégral

BACKGROUND: Nutritional factors play a key role in normal dermatologic functioning. However, little is known about the effects of diet on skin-aging appearance. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the associations between nutrient intakes and skin-aging appearance. DESIGN: Using data from the first National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, we examined associations between nutrient intakes and skin aging in 4025 women (40-74 y). Nutrients were estimated from a 24-h recall. Clinical examinations of the skin were conducted by dermatologists. Skin-aging appearance was defined as having a wrinkled appearance, senile dryness, and skin atrophy. RESULTS: Higher vitamin C intakes were associated with a lower likelihood of a wrinkled appearance [odds ratio (OR) 0.89; 95% CI: 0.82, 0.96] and senile dryness (OR: 0.93; 95% CI: 0.87, 0.99). Higher linoleic acid intakes were associated with a lower likelihood of senile dryness (OR: 0.75; 95% CI: 0.64, 0.88) and skin atrophy (OR: 0.78; 95% CI 0.65, 0.95). A 17-g increase in fat and a 50-g increase in carbohydrate intakes increased the likelihood of a wrinkled appearance (OR: 1.28 and 1.36, respectively) and skin atrophy (OR: 1.37 and 1.33, respectively). These associations were independent of age, race, education, sunlight exposure, income, menopausal status, body mass index, supplement use, physical activity, and energy intake. CONCLUSIONS: Higher intakes of vitamin C and linoleic acid and lower intakes of fats and carbohydr
ates are associated with better skin-aging appearance. Promoting healthy dietary behaviors may have additional benefit for skin appearance in addition to other health outcomes in the population.

(Revue

American journal of clinical nutrition AJN
ISSN : 0002-9165

Information bibliographique

Langue:
English
Type:
Journal Article
Sur AGRIS depuis:
2013
Volume:
86
Numéro:
4
Page initiale:
1225
Page finale:
1231
Editeur:
American Society for Nutrition
Tous les titres:
"Dietary nutrient intakes and skin-aging appearance among middle-aged American women [Erratum: 2008 Aug., v. 88, no. 2, p. 480.]"@eng
Autre:
"Includes references"
Loading...

Information bibliographique

Langue:
English
Type:
Journal Article
Sur AGRIS depuis:
2013
Volume:
86
Numéro:
4
Page initiale:
1225
Page finale:
1231
Editeur:
American Society for Nutrition
Tous les titres:
"Dietary nutrient intakes and skin-aging appearance among middle-aged American women [Erratum: 2008 Aug., v. 88, no. 2, p. 480.]"@eng
Autre:
"Includes references"