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Paper

Written Paper

Organic farming in north-east hill region in India  [2003]

N. Ghosh;

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This paper investigates the practice of organic (non-fertiliser) farming in seven north-eastern hill states of India (Arunchal Pradesh, Manipur, Meghalya, Mizoram, Nagaland, Sikkim and Tripura) and examines which farmers use it, which groups of crops it is used for, and whether it involves the use of chemical inputs other than fertilisers. It analyses data from the National Sample Survey Organisation on cultivation practices in 1997-98.It finds that, in these north-eastern states:fertilisers are used by only 27 per cent of farms, and the most common practice (45 per cent of farms) is to use neither manure nor fertiliser; this reverses the pattern found in all other regions of India smaller farmers are more likely to use fertilisers than larger farmers; but even amongst the small farms, the most common practice is the use of neither manure nor fertilisers amongst the largest category of farms, the most common practice (49 per cent) is to use manure but no fertiliser organic farms are typically not irrigated and possess fewer assets than farms that use fertilisers; however, organic farms are more likely to possess livestock larger proportions of fertiliser users also use technologies such as improved seed, mechanisation, and insecticides than other types of farm however, substantial proportions of farms that do not use fertilisers or manure do use improved seeds (35 per cent) and insecticides (12 per cent) for farms using neither manure nor fertiliser, most
commonly grown crops were oilseeds, pulses, mixed crops and fruits; for those using manure they were coarse cereals, fodder and vegetables; and for those using fertilisers, wheat, rice and sugarcane.The paper concludes that organic farming is a promising avenue for development given the particular circumstances of this region which include possible adverse effects of most modern methods in industry and agriculture on the plains and the abundance of difficult yet fertile tracts of land.It also suggests that organic practices could combat poverty in the region since they particularly benefit those with limited access to farm assets and irrigation. Finally it argues that the promotion of systematic organic farming and food processing could help attract investment, which in turn would increase labour force participation and encourage integration of the region with the outside economy.

Bibliographic information

Language:
English
In AGRIS since:
2013
Publisher:
Institute of Economic Growth, Delhi University
All titles:
"Organic farming in north-east hill region in India"@eng
Other:
"Possible benefits of farming without fertilisers"
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Bibliographic information

Language:
English
In AGRIS since:
2013
Publisher:
Institute of Economic Growth, Delhi University
All titles:
"Organic farming in north-east hill region in India"@eng
Other:
"Possible benefits of farming without fertilisers"