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Journal Article

Journal Article

Relay-intercropped soybean in different water regimes, planting patterns, and winter wheat cultivars  [1997]

Duncan, S.R. (Kansas State University, Hutchinson, KS.); Schapaugh, W.T. Jr.;

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Relay-intercropping soybean Glycine max (L.) Merr. into winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) at the boot stage may be a profitable production alternative in environments where doublecropped soybean production after wheat harvest is unreliable. However, moisture availability, planting pattern, and growth characteristics of different wheat cultivars may influence soybean survival and final yield. To better define the conditions under which relay-intercropping would be acceptable to growers, we compared the influences of water regimes, planting patterns, and wheat cultivars on soybean growth and yield. In 1988 and 1989, five wheat cultivars were planted in solid and skip-row patterns near Manhattan and Rossville, KS, and 'Resnik' soybean was intercropped in wheat at the late boot stage. All plots received equal irrigation prior to wheat harvest and different amounts (limited vs. full) during the remaining growing season. Soybean yields at Rossville were not affected by irrigation regime, but at Manhattan, fully irrigated soybean yields were 27% greater than soybean under limited irrigation. The intercrop competition period averaged 16 d longer in 1989 than in 1990. Wheat was planted in 8 in. rows in a solid and one-out-of-three skip-row pattern. Soybean in all planting patterns was in 24 in. rows- between the 8 in. wheat rows, in the middle of the 16 in. skip, or in a conventionally tilled, sole cropped (SC) planting. When intercropped in solid wheat stands (S
I), soybean yielded 52 and 37% of soybean in skip-row intercropped (SRI) and SC patterns, respectively, in 1989, and 80 and 64% of SRI and SC yields, respectively, in 1990. Solid intercropped soybean received 36 and 64% of the total measured photosynthetically active radiation that reached SC and SRI soybean canopies, respectively. Seventy six percent of unharvested soybean plots (reduced or eliminated populations) were SI. Soybean intercropped into short wheat cultivars had higher (14 to 20%) yields than soybean
From the journal
Journal of production agriculture (USA)
ISSN : 0890-8524

Bibliographic information

Language:
English
Type:
Journal Article
In AGRIS since:
1998
Volume:
10
Issue:
1
Start Page:
123
End Page:
129
All titles:
"Relay-intercropped soybean in different water regimes, planting patterns, and winter wheat cultivars"@eng
Other:
"references"
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Bibliographic information

Language:
English
Type:
Journal Article
In AGRIS since:
1998
Volume:
10
Issue:
1
Start Page:
123
End Page:
129
All titles:
"Relay-intercropped soybean in different water regimes, planting patterns, and winter wheat cultivars"@eng
Other:
"references"