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The National Agricultural Library is one of four national libraries of the United States, with locations in Beltsville, Maryland and Washington, D.C. It houses one of the world's largest and most accessible agricultural information collections and serves as the nexus for a national network of state land-grant and U.S. Department of Agriculture field libraries. In fiscal year 2011 (Oct 2010 through Sept 2011) NAL delivered more than 100 million direct customer service transactions.

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Journal Article

Journal Article

History, Contribution, and Future of Quantitative Genetics in Plant Breeding: Lessons From Maize  [2007]

Hallauer, A.R.;

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The time frame of the history of quantitative genetics is similar to Mendelian genetics. The rediscovery of Mendel's laws of inheritance in 1900 was the basis for determining the inheritance of quantitative traits and for developing plant breeding and selection methods. Because of the differences expressed by many of the leading geneticists relative to importance of continuous vs. discontinuous variation in evolution, the acceptance of the concepts for the study of quantitative genetics was delayed. R.A. Fisher, S. Wright, and J.B.S. Haldane were the primary early contributors for developing the theory and methods for studying the inheritance of quantitative traits. Greater interest in the inheritance of quantitative traits in plants occurred after 1946, primarily because of the heterosis expressed in maize (Zea mays L.) hybrids. During the past 50 yr, extensive research has been conducted to determine the relative importance of different genetic effects in the inheritance of quantitative traits for most cultivated plant species. Quantitative genetic research has contributed extensive information to assist plant breeders in developing breeding and selection strategies. Directly and/or indirectly, the principles for the inheritance of quantitative traits are pervasive in developing superior cultivars to meet the food, feed, fuel, and fiber needs the world demands. The principles of quantitative genetics will have continued importance in the future, but at d
ifferent levels. Information from molecular genetics research will be integrated with our current knowledge at the phenotypic level to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of plant breeding.
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Crop science
ISSN : 0011-183X

Bibliographic information

Language:
English
Type:
Journal Article
In AGRIS since:
2013
Volume:
47 suppl. 3
Start Page:
S4
End Page:
S19
All titles:
"History, Contribution, and Future of Quantitative Genetics in Plant Breeding: Lessons From Maize"@eng
Other:
"Paper presented at the 2006 International Plant Breeding Symposium, held August 21-26, 2006, Mexico City, Mexico. Includes references"
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Bibliographic information

Language:
English
Type:
Journal Article
In AGRIS since:
2013
Volume:
47 suppl. 3
Start Page:
S4
End Page:
S19
All titles:
"History, Contribution, and Future of Quantitative Genetics in Plant Breeding: Lessons From Maize"@eng
Other:
"Paper presented at the 2006 International Plant Breeding Symposium, held August 21-26, 2006, Mexico City, Mexico. Includes references"