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The National Agricultural Library is one of four national libraries of the United States, with locations in Beltsville, Maryland and Washington, D.C. It houses one of the world's largest and most accessible agricultural information collections and serves as the nexus for a national network of state land-grant and U.S. Department of Agriculture field libraries. In fiscal year 2011 (Oct 2010 through Sept 2011) NAL delivered more than 100 million direct customer service transactions.

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Journal Article

Journal Article

Evolution of halophytes: multiple origins of salt tolerance in land plants  [2010]

Flowers, Timothy J.; Galal, Hanaa K.; Bromham, Lindell;

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The evolution of salt tolerance is interesting for several reasons. First, since salt-tolerant plants (halophytes) employ several different mechanisms to deal with salt, the evolution of salt tolerance represents a fascinating case study in the evolution of a complex trait. Second, the diversity of mechanisms employed by halophytes, based on processes common to all plants, sheds light on the way that a plant's physiology can become adapted to deal with extreme conditions. Third, as the amount of salt-affected land increases around the globe, understanding the origins of the diversity of halophytes should provide a basis for the use of novel species in bioremediation and conservation. In this review we pose the question, how many times has salt tolerance evolved since the emergence of the land plants some 450-470million years ago? We summarise the physiological mechanisms underlying salt-tolerance and provide an overview of the number and diversity of salt-tolerant terrestrial angiosperms (defined as plants that survive to complete their life cycle in at least 200mM salt). We consider the evolution of halophytes using information from fossils and phylogenies. Finally, we discuss the potential for halophytes to contribute to agriculture and land management and ask why, when there are naturally occurring halophytes, it is proving to be difficult to breed salt-tolerant crops.
From the journal
Functional plant biology FPB
ISSN : 1445-4408

Bibliographic information

Language:
English
Type:
Other
In AGRIS since:
2013
Volume:
37
Issue:
7
Start Page:
604
End Page:
612
Publisher:
Collingwood, Victoria: CSIRO Publishing
All titles:
"Evolution of halophytes: multiple origins of salt tolerance in land plants"@eng
Other:
"In the special issue: Improving adaptation to saline environments. Includes references"
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Bibliographic information

Language:
English
Type:
Other
In AGRIS since:
2013
Volume:
37
Issue:
7
Start Page:
604
End Page:
612
Publisher:
Collingwood, Victoria: CSIRO Publishing
All titles:
"Evolution of halophytes: multiple origins of salt tolerance in land plants"@eng
Other:
"In the special issue: Improving adaptation to saline environments. Includes references"