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Journal Article

Journal Article

Adherence to the Mediterranean diet, long-term weight change, and incident overweight or obesity: the Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra (SUN) cohort  [2010]

Beunza, Juan-José; Toledo, Estefanía; Hu, Frank B.; Bes-Rastrollo, Maira; et al.

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BACKGROUND: The Mediterranean dietary pattern might be a potential tool for the prevention of obesity. OBJECTIVES: We studied the association between adherence to 6 previously published scores used to assess the adherence to the Mediterranean diet and weight change. We also assessed the risk of relevant weight gain (≥5 kg) or the risk of developing overweight or obesity. DESIGN: The study population included 10,376 Spanish men and women who were university graduates (mean age = 38 y) and were followed up for a mean (±SD) of 5.7 ± 2.2 y. Diet was assessed at baseline with a 136-item, previously validated food-frequency questionnaire. Weight was assessed at baseline and biennially during follow-up. RESULTS: Participants with the lowest adherence ([less-than or equal to]3 points) to the Mediterranean dietary score (MDS) proposed by Trichopoulou et al (range: 0-9; N Engl J Med 2003;348:2599-608) exhibited the highest average yearly weight gain, whereas participants with the highest (≥6 points) adherence exhibited the lowest weight gain (adjusted difference: -0.059 kg/y; 95% CI: -0.111, -0.008 kg/y; P for trend = 0.02). This inverse association was extended to other a priori-defined MDSs. The group with the highest adherence to the MDS also showed the lowest risk of relevant weight gain (≥5 kg) during the first 4 y of follow-up (odds ratio: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.64, 0.90). CONCLUSIONS: Adherence to the Mediterranean dietary pattern is significantly associated with re
duced weight gain. This dietary pattern can be recommended to slow down age-related weight gain.
From the journal
American journal of clinical nutrition
ISSN : 0002-9165

Bibliographic information

Language:
English
Type:
Journal Article
In AGRIS since:
2013
Volume:
92
Issue:
6
Start Page:
1484
End Page:
1493
Publisher:
American Society for Clinical Nutrition
All titles:
"Adherence to the Mediterranean diet, long-term weight change, and incident overweight or obesity: the Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra (SUN) cohort"@eng
Other:
"Includes references"
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Bibliographic information

Language:
English
Type:
Journal Article
In AGRIS since:
2013
Volume:
92
Issue:
6
Start Page:
1484
End Page:
1493
Publisher:
American Society for Clinical Nutrition
All titles:
"Adherence to the Mediterranean diet, long-term weight change, and incident overweight or obesity: the Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra (SUN) cohort"@eng
Other:
"Includes references"