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Journal Article

Journal Article

Evaluation of the South African Dorper as a terminal sire breed for growth, carcass, and palatability characteristics  [2003]

Snowder, G.D.; Duckett, S.K.;

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The South African Dorper is an important terminal meat sire breed in Africa that was recently imported into the United States. The objective of this study was to evaluate the Dorper as a terminal meat sire breed for U.S. production. Semen from purebred Dorper sires was used to artificially inseminate Columbia ewes to produce F1 crossbred lambs. Growth and carcass characteristics of F1 Dorper-Columbia lambs (n = 165), F1 Suffolk-Columbia (n = 89), and purebred Columbia lambs (n = 207) were compared based on subsets of the total number of animals. The F1 Dorper lambs grew significantly slower (313 g•d-1) and weighed less (29.8 kg) than F1 Suffolk- (357 g•d-1, 33.5 kg) and Columbia-sired lambs (328 g•d-1, 31 kg) at 77 d of age. However, at a weaning age of 118 d weaning weight and ADG did not differ (P > 0.20) among sire breed groups. Postweaning growth of F1 Dorper (239 g•d-1) wether lambs did not differ from that of purebred Columbia wethers (230 g•d-1) but was less than that of F1 Suffolk lambs (259 g•d-1; P = 0.09). Feed efficiency did not differ among breed types. Breed types had similar dressing percentages (53%), shoulder fat depth (2.8 mm), body wall thickness (3 cm), leg conformation score (Choice), Yield grade (2.4), and Quality grade (Choice). Weight of wholesale shoulders and racks made up approximately 38% of the carcass weight in the Columbia and F1 Suffolk-Columbia type but only 33% in the F1 Dorper-Columbia lambs. However, the more expensive w
holesale loins from F1 Dorpers were heavier (P < 0.01) than the other breed types. Total weights of wholesale legs were similar among F1 Dorpers and F1 Suffolks but were heavier than those for the purebred Columbia (P < 0.05). Percentages of total wholesale primal cuts were similar among breed types (P > 0.10). Chemical composition of the carcass did not differ significantly between breed types with a mean composition of 52% moisture, 30% lipid (ether extract), 17% protein, and 0.76% ash. Warner-Bratzler shear force values were less (P < 0.05) and sensory panel ratings for tenderness were significantly more favorable for lamb chops from Dorper sired lambs. Dorper rams can be used as terminal meat sires to produce lambs whose growth rate to 118 d of weaning age, postweaning ADG and feed efficiency, and carcass characteristics are similar to that of Suffolk crossbred lambs and purebred Columbia lambs but with a slight improvement in tenderness.
From the journal
Journal of animal science
ISSN : 1525-3163

Bibliographic information

Language:
English
Type:
Journal Article
In AGRIS since:
2013
Volume:
81
Issue:
2
Start Page:
368
End Page:
375
All titles:
"Evaluation of the South African Dorper as a terminal sire breed for growth, carcass, and palatability characteristics"@eng
Other:
"Includes references"
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Bibliographic information

Language:
English
Type:
Journal Article
In AGRIS since:
2013
Volume:
81
Issue:
2
Start Page:
368
End Page:
375
All titles:
"Evaluation of the South African Dorper as a terminal sire breed for growth, carcass, and palatability characteristics"@eng
Other:
"Includes references"