AGRIS

Data provider:

Icon data provider

The National Agricultural Library is one of four national libraries of the United States, with locations in Beltsville, Maryland and Washington, D.C. It houses one of the world's largest and most accessible agricultural information collections and serves as the nexus for a national network of state land-grant and U.S. Department of Agriculture field libraries. In fiscal year 2011 (Oct 2010 through Sept 2011) NAL delivered more than 100 million direct customer service transactions.

Active (Data provider submitted metadata in the last calendar year)
Journal Article

Journal Article

Worldwide ant invasions under climate change  [2015]

Bertelsmeier, Cleo; Luque, Gloria M.; Hoffmann, Benjamin D.; Courchamp, Franck;

Access the full text

Many ants are among the most globally significant invasive species. They have caused the local decline and extinction of a variety of taxa ranging from plants to mammals. They disturb ecosystem processes, decrease agricultural production, damage infrastructure and can be a health hazard for humans. Overall, economic costs caused by invasive ants amount to several billion US $ annually. There is general consensus that the future distributions of invasive species are likely to expand with climate change, however this dogma remains poorly tested. Here we model suitable area globally for 15 of the worst invasive ant species, both currently and with predicted climate change (in 2080), globally, regionally and within the world’s 34 biodiversity hotspots. Surprisingly, the potential distribution of only five species was predicted to increase (up to 35.8 %) with climate change, with most declining by up to 63.3 %. The ant invasion hotspots are predominantly in tropical and subtropical regions of South America, Africa, Asia and Oceanic islands, and particularly correspond with biodiversity hotspots. Contrary to general expectations, climate change and invasive ant species will not systematically act synergistically. However, ant invasions will likely remain as a major global problem, especially where invasion hotspots coincide with biodiversity hotspots.
From the journal
Biodiversity and conservation
ISSN : 0960-3115

Bibliographic information

Language:
English
Type:
Journal Article
In AGRIS since:
2015
Volume:
24
Issue:
1
Start Page:
117
End Page:
128
Publisher:
Springer-Verlag
All titles:
"Worldwide ant invasions under climate change"@eng
Loading...

Bibliographic information

Language:
English
Type:
Journal Article
In AGRIS since:
2015
Volume:
24
Issue:
1
Start Page:
117
End Page:
128
Publisher:
Springer-Verlag
All titles:
"Worldwide ant invasions under climate change"@eng