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The National Agricultural Library is one of four national libraries of the United States, with locations in Beltsville, Maryland and Washington, D.C. It houses one of the world's largest and most accessible agricultural information collections and serves as the nexus for a national network of state land-grant and U.S. Department of Agriculture field libraries. In fiscal year 2011 (Oct 2010 through Sept 2011) NAL delivered more than 100 million direct customer service transactions.

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Journal Article

Journal Article

Comparison of pressure distribution under a conventional saddle and a treeless saddle at sitting trot  [2012]

Belock, B.; Kaiser, L.J.; Lavagnino, M.; Clayton, H.M.;

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It can be a challenge to find a conventional saddle that is a good fit for both horse and rider. An increasing number of riders are purchasing treeless saddles because they are thought to fit a wider range of equine back shapes, but there is only limited research to support this theory. The objective of this study was to compare the total force and pressure distribution patterns on the horse’s back with conventional and treeless saddles. The experimental hypotheses were that the conventional saddle would distribute the force over a larger area with lower mean and maximal pressures than the treeless saddle. Eight horses were ridden by a single rider at sitting trot with conventional and treeless saddles. An electronic pressure mat measured total force, area of saddle contact, maximal pressure and area with mean pressure >11kPa for 10 strides with each saddle. Univariate ANOVA (P<0.05) was used to detect differences between saddles. Compared with the treeless saddle, the conventional saddle distributed the rider’s bodyweight over a larger area, had lower mean and maximal pressures and fewer sensors recording mean pressure >11kPa. These findings suggested that the saddle tree was effective in distributing the weight of the saddle and rider over a larger area and in avoiding localized areas of force concentration.
From the journal
The Veterinary Journal
ISSN : 1090-0233

Bibliographic information

Language:
English
Type:
Journal Article
In AGRIS since:
2015
Volume:
193
Issue:
1
Start Page:
87
End Page:
91
Publisher:
Elsevier Ltd
All titles:
"Comparison of pressure distribution under a conventional saddle and a treeless saddle at sitting trot"@eng
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Bibliographic information

Language:
English
Type:
Journal Article
In AGRIS since:
2015
Volume:
193
Issue:
1
Start Page:
87
End Page:
91
Publisher:
Elsevier Ltd
All titles:
"Comparison of pressure distribution under a conventional saddle and a treeless saddle at sitting trot"@eng