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The National Agricultural Library is one of four national libraries of the United States, with locations in Beltsville, Maryland and Washington, D.C. It houses one of the world's largest and most accessible agricultural information collections and serves as the nexus for a national network of state land-grant and U.S. Department of Agriculture field libraries. In fiscal year 2011 (Oct 2010 through Sept 2011) NAL delivered more than 100 million direct customer service transactions.

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Journal Article

Journal Article

State of the art and perspectives in catalytic processes for CO2 conversion into chemicals and fuels: The distinctive contribution of chemical catalysis and biotechnology  [2016]

Aresta, Michele; Dibenedetto, Angela; Quaranta, Eugenio;

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The need to reduce the emission of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere is pushing toward the use of “renewable carbon”, so to avoid as much as possible burning “fossil carbon”. It would be possible to complement the natural “carbon cycle” by developing man-made industrial processes for “carbon recycling”, converting, thus, “spent carbon” as CO2 into “working carbon”, as that present in valuable chemicals or fuels. Such practice would fall into the utilization of “renewable carbon”, as the man-made process would perfectly mimic the natural process. An order of complexity higher would be represented by the integration of biotechnology and catalysis for an effective CO2 conversion, using selective catalysts such as enzymes, or even whole microorganisms, coupled to chemical technologies for energy supply to enzymes, using perennial sources as sun or wind or geothermal as primary energy.These days all the above approaches are under investigation with an interesting complementarity of public–private investment in research. This paper aimed at making the state of the art in CO2 conversion and giving a perspective on the potential of such technology. Each atom of C we can recycle is an atom of fossil carbon left in the underground for next generations that will not reach the atmosphere today.
From the journal
Journal of catalysis
ISSN : 0021-9517

Bibliographic information

Language:
English
Type:
Journal Article
In AGRIS since:
2018
Volume:
343
Issue:
2
Extent:
2-45
Publisher:
Elsevier Inc.
All titles:
"State of the art and perspectives in catalytic processes for CO2 conversion into chemicals and fuels: The distinctive contribution of chemical catalysis and biotechnology"@eng
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Bibliographic information

Language:
English
Type:
Journal Article
In AGRIS since:
2018
Volume:
343
Issue:
2
Extent:
2-45
Publisher:
Elsevier Inc.
All titles:
"State of the art and perspectives in catalytic processes for CO2 conversion into chemicals and fuels: The distinctive contribution of chemical catalysis and biotechnology"@eng