AGRIS

Data provider:

Icon data provider

The National Agricultural Library is one of four national libraries of the United States, with locations in Beltsville, Maryland and Washington, D.C. It houses one of the world's largest and most accessible agricultural information collections and serves as the nexus for a national network of state land-grant and U.S. Department of Agriculture field libraries. In fiscal year 2011 (Oct 2010 through Sept 2011) NAL delivered more than 100 million direct customer service transactions.

Active (Data provider submitted metadata in the last calendar year)
Journal Article

Journal Article

Effects of hydrocolloids on processing and qualities of wheat tortillas  [1993]

Friend, C.P.; Waniska, R.D.; Rooney, L.W.;

Access the full text

  • NOT AVAILABLE
Effects of hydrocolloids were evaluated in hot-press wheat tortillas. Natural (arabic, guar, and xanthan), modified cellulose (carboxymethylcellulose [CMC], hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, and methylcellulose), and commercial blends (mixtures of natural and modified cellulose gums) were utilized. Farinograph values, mixing characteristics, dough machinability, tortilla characteristics (diameter, weight, moisture content, and appearance), rollability over time, and freeze-thaw stability were determined. Increased levels of gums resulted in doughs that were more sticky and less cohesive throughout mixing. Doughs prepared with commercial blends containing cellulose gum exhibited characteristics similar to CMC, such as lower initial dough viscosity and longer dough development times compared with those of the control. Hot-press wheat tortillas containing natural gums, modified cellulose gums, or commercial blends were consistently round, puffed, slightly browned, and of good quality. Tortilla diameters (159 mm), weights (41.4 g), and moisture content (30.8%) were similar for all tortillas. Water absorption of dough increased when more gums were added. The rollability of tortillas was retained longer with CMC and cellulose-based commercial blends. Rollability of all tortillas decreased during freezing and thawing, and tortillas containing CMC were significantly more rollable than control tortillas after five freeze-thaw cycles. Proper gluten development appears
to be essential for good dough machinability, tortilla qualities, and tortilla shelf stability
From the journal
Cereal chemistry (USA)
ISSN : 0009-0352

Bibliographic information

Language:
English
Type:
Journal Article
In AGRIS since:
1994
Volume:
70
Issue:
3
Start Page:
252
End Page:
256
All titles:
"Effects of hydrocolloids on processing and qualities of wheat tortillas"@eng
Other:
"references"
Loading...

Bibliographic information

Language:
English
Type:
Journal Article
In AGRIS since:
1994
Volume:
70
Issue:
3
Start Page:
252
End Page:
256
All titles:
"Effects of hydrocolloids on processing and qualities of wheat tortillas"@eng
Other:
"references"